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Edible Weeds

12 Weeds You Can Eat

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Got weeds? Then, you've got dinner. Take a closer look at the weeds growing in your yard, and you'll find that many of them are edible, delicious and nutritious. Here are 12 edible weeds to locate and try:

Blackberries

blackberries.jpg
Photo © Erin Huffstetler

Edible Parts: Fruit, leaves and roots

When to Harvest: Late summer

Uses: Eat fruit fresh or use in jams, syrups and baked goods. Use leaves or root bark to make tea.

Recipes:

Burdock

burdockflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user Peter aka anemoneprojectors

Edible Parts: Roots and stalks

When to Harvest: Spring through fall

Uses: Use young stalks in place of artichoke hearts. Use cooked roots in soups and casseroles.

Recipes:

Cattails

cattailsflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user liz_west

Edible Parts: Shoots, flower heads and pollen

When to Harvest: Late spring

Uses: Eat peeled shoots raw and in salads; add them to stir-fry; or enjoy them cooked. Boil young female flowerheads, and eat them like corn. Use pollen in place of flour.

Recipes:

Chicory

chicoryflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user DM

Edible Parts: Flowers, leaves and roots

When to Harvest: Spring through fall, but leaves and blossoms are best when harvested young

Uses: Use in the same manner that you would use dandelions.

Recipes:

Dandelions

dandelion.jpg
Photo © Erin Huffstetler

Edible Parts: Flowers, leaves and roots

When to Harvest: Spring through fall, but leaves and blossoms are best when harvested young

Uses: Add leaves and flowers raw to salads. Sautee the leaves; make dandelion wine or jelly out of the blossoms; or use the roots to make a coffee substititute.

Recipes:

Japanese Knotweed

japaneseknotweedflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user Jessie_Hirsch

Edible Part: Young shoots

When to Harvest: Early spring before the plant gets woody.

Uses: Use shoots in place of rhubarb. Steam it. Add it to soups; use it to make jam; or try it in baked desserts.

Recipes:

Lamb's Quarters

lambsquartersflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user Wendell Smith

Edible Parts: Leaves and stems

When to Harvest: Mid-spring to late fall

Uses: Add raw to salads. Sautee and serve as a vegetable. Use in place of spinach.

Recipes:

Plantain

plantains.jpg
Photo © Erin Huffstetler

Edible Parts: Leaves and seeds

When to Harvest: Spring through fall

Uses: Add young leaves to salads. Sautee older leaves. Eat seeds raw or roasted.

Recipes:

Purslane

purslaneflickr.jpg
Photo © Flickr user Lil Rose

Edible Parts: Leaves, stem, flowers and seeds

When to Harvest: Summer

Uses: Add raw to salads; toss in soups; boil it; or sautee it.

Recipes:

More About Purslane

Weed Harvesting Guidelines

1. Only harvest weeds that you can positively identify and know to be edible. The Complete Guide to Edible Wild Plants, by the Department of the Army is a good reference, if you aren't sure.

2. Avoid picking weeds close to roadways. They'll have absorbed exhaust fumes and road run off.

3. Avoid harvesting weeds in areas that may have been contaminated by animal feces.

4. Do not pick weeds from yards that have been treated with pesticides or herbicides.

5. Only eat the parts of plants that you know to be edible. Many edible plants have non-edible – and sometimes poisonous – parts.

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